301 Redirect – A 301 redirect automatically causes one url to redirect to another and tells the Web (and search engines) that this redirect is permanent. 301 redirects are generally preferable for Search Engine Optimization purposes.

Google AdWords – AdWords is Google’s paid search marketing program where a user bids on keywords to determine ad position.

Affiliate Marketing – A type of internet marketing in which you partner with other Web sites, individuals, or companies to send traffic to your site.

Algorithm – The formula  used by search enignes to determine the rankings of your Natural Listings. Search engines will periodically send a Spider through your Web site to read all its information. Their programs analyze this and other data to value your site and determine whether or not, and how high or low pages on your site will appears on various searches.

ALT Tags – HTML tags used to describe Web site images by displaying a block of text when moused-over.

Google Analytics– Also known as Web Metrics. Analytics refers to collection of data about a Web site and its users.

Anchor Text – The clickable words of a hypertext link.

Backlinks– Links from other Web sites pointing to any particular page on your site. Also called Inbound Links.

ccTLD – ccTLD’s are “Country-code” TLD‘s showing what country a site is focused on or based in. Using Google and the United Kingdom as an example, Google UK is google.co.uk. Sometimes these ccTLD’s are two sets of letters separated by a period (e.g. “co.uk” for the UK or “com.au” for Australia) and sometimes they are just one set of letters (e.g. “.fr” for France).

Use of separate Web sites on unique ccTLD’s is typically viewed as the best way for exporters to target other countries via search engine optimization. However, site owners can also target outside countries through other means such as through country-focused subdomains or even subdirectories.

Click through Rate (CTR) – # of clicks / # of impressions. Click through rate is a common internet marketing measurement tool for ad effectiveness. This rate tells you how many times people are actually clicking on your ad out of the number of times your ad is shown. Low click through rates can be caused by a number of factors, including copy, placement, and relevance.

Cloaking– Showing a search engine spider or bot one version of a Web page and a different version to the end user. Several search engines have explicit rules against unapproved cloaking. Those violating these guidelines may find their pages penalized or banned from a search engine’s index. As for approved cloaking, this generally only happens with search engines that offer a paid inclusion program. Anyone offering cloaking services should be able to demonstrate explicit approval from a search engine for what it is they intend to do.

Content Management System – Content Management Systems (CMS) allow Web site owners to make text and picture changes to their Web sites without specialized programming knowledge of software like Adobe Dreamweaver or Microsoft FrontPage. Content Management Systems can be edited by anyone with basic word knowledge via an internet connection. No need for length or costly web development contracts or need to wait on someone outside your company to make changes. CMS examples include WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla.

Content Network – Each major search engine offers a form of content network within its paid search interface, typically referred to as content networks, although Google just renamed their content network the Google Display Network. Within Google AdWords, advertisers have two options for content network advertising:

  1. Pick sites. With this option, you can choose the actual sites, or in some cases, sections and pages of sites, on which you want to display your ads.
  2. Contextual advertising. Contextual advertising allows you to use keywords like you would in traditional paid search advertising and the search engines will display your ads next to articles, blog posts, and other Web pages that are related to those keywords.

Both options are great for inexpensive brand awareness on massive scales in addition to more direct means such as lead generation. The days of buying remnant display ads not being worth it are behind us.

- See more at: http://www.directom.com/dom/semresources/internetmarketingtermglossary/#sthash.6jdcKBAH.dpuf

 

Black Hat SEO – The opposite of White Hat SEO, these Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, tactics are (attempted) ways of tricking the Search Engines to get better rankings for a Web site.

Blog – Short for Web log, blogs are part journal, part Web site.

ccTLD – ccTLD’s are “Country-code” TLD‘s showing what country a site is focused on or based in. Using Google and the United Kingdom as an example, Google UK is google.co.uk.

Click through Rate (CTR) – # of clicks / # of impressions. Click through rate is a common internet marketing measurement tool for ad effectiveness. This rate tells you how many times people are actually clicking on your ad out of the number of times your ad is shown.

Cloaking– Showing a search engine spider or bot one version of a Web page and a different version to the end user.

Content Management System – Content Management Systems (CMS) allow Web site owners to make text and picture changes to their Web sites without specialized programming knowledge of software. CMS examples include WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla.

Conversion Rate – This statistic, or metric, tells you what percentage of people is converting - meaning sign up for free information, a completed survey, a purchase, etc.

Cookie – A file stored on your computer when you visit a Web site. Cookies provide benefits, including remembering passwords.

Cost per Click (CPC) – CPC means you pay a pre-determined amount each time someone clicks on your advertisement to visit your site.

Cost per Impression (CPM) – You agree to pay a set cost for every (as an example) 1,000 Impressions your ad receives.

Crawler – A search engine’s crawler (also known as a Spider or robot) follows links to Web Pages. It makes copies of those pages and stores them in a search engine’s index.

CSS – short for Cascading Style Sheet – is a way to move style elements off individual Web pages and sites to allow for faster loading pages, smaller file sizes, and other benefits for visitors, search engines, and designers.

Domain Name – A Web site’s main address. Our domain name is webprezz.com.

eCommerce – The ability to purchase online.

Forum – A place on the internet where people come together to find information and discuss topics.

Geo-Targeting – The ability to reach potential clients by their physical location.

Header (or Heading) Tags () – HTML heading and subheading tags.

HTML– HyperText Markup Language, the programming language used in Web sites.

Hyperlink – Often blue and underlined, hyperlinks, commonly called “links” for short, allow you to navigate to other pages on the Web.

Inbound or Incoming Links – See Backlinks

Index – The collection of information a search engine has that searchers can query against.

Internet Marketing – Any of a number of ways to reach internet users, including Search Engine Marketing, Search Engine Optimization, and Online advertising.

Internal Linking – Placing hyperlinks on a page to other pages within the same site.


JavaScript – JavaScript – not to be confused with Java is used primarily to improve user experiences on Web sites with enhanced functionality.

Keyword – Almost interchangeable with Search Term, keywords are words or a group of words that a person may search for in a Search Engine.

Landing Page – The first page a person sees when coming to your Web site.

Link Building – The process of obtaining hyperlinks (links) from Web sites back to yours.

Link Popularity – How many Web sites link to yours, how popular those linking sites are, and how much their content relates to yours.

Local Search –  Local search allows users to find businesses and Web sites within a specific (local) geographic range.


Local Business Listings –  Local business listings that appear next to maps at the top of the page on many locally targeted searches.

Long Tail Keywords – Rather than targeting the most common keywords in your industry, you can focus on more niche terms that are usually longer phrases but are also easier and quicker to rank for in the search engines.


Meta Search Engine – A search engine that gets listings from two or more other search engines rather than crawling the Web itself.

Meta Tags (see also keyword tags, description tags etc.) – Meta tags allow you to highlight important Keywords related to your site in a way that matters to Search Engines, but that your Web site visitors typically do not see.


Natural Listings – Also referred to as “organic results”, the non-advertised listings in Search Engines.

Opt-out – The ability to stop receiving newsletters, calls, etc. at any time.

Organic Listings –See Natural Listings.

Outbound Links – Links on any Web page leading to another Web page, whether they are within the same site or another Web site.

PageRank – PageRank is a value that Google assigns for pages and Web sites that it indexes, based on all the factors in its algorithm.

Paid Inclusion – Advertising program where pages are guaranteed to be included in a search engine’s index in exchange for payment, though no guarantee of ranking well is typically given.

Pay per Click (PPC) – See Cost per Click (CPC), above.


Rank – How well a particular Web page or Web site is listed in the Search Engine’s Results.

Real Simple Syndication (RSS) – A technology that allows information to be easily shared on Web sites or given directly to users per their request.


Reciprocal Link – A link exchange between two sites. Both sites will display a link to the other site somewhere on their pages. This type of link is generally much less desirable than a one-way inbound link.

Responsive Web Design (RWD) - a web design technique used to create sites that provide an optimal viewing experience—easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling—across a wide range of devices (from mobile phones to desktop computer monitors).

Robots.txt – A file used to keep Web pages from being indexed or to tell which pages you want a search engine to index.

Search Engines – Search engines are places people go to search for things on the web.


Search Engine Marketing – All forms of marketing involving search engines – chiefly Search Engine Optimization and Paid Search Marketing.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) –  The techniques used to enable a website to rank highly in a search engine.


Search Engine Results Page – Search Engine Results Pages, or SERPs, are the Web pages displayed by any Search Engine for any given search.


Search Terms – A search term is a word or group of words that a person types into a Search Engine to find what they are looking for.

SEM – Acronym for search engine marketing and may also be used to refer to a person or company that does Search Engine Marketing – either Paid Search, Search Engine Optimization, or both.

SEO – Search Engine Optimization Acronym.


Social Media - A type of online media where information is uploaded by user submission.


Spider – Search Engine spiders crawl through all the linked pages of a Web site to gather information to include the site in their results.

URL – Uniform Resource Locator. These are the letters and symbols that make up the address of specific Web pages. This page’s URL is http://www.webprezz.com.

Unique Value Proposition (UVP) – What it is that sets your product, service, or company apart from others and why potential clients should care enough to choose you.


Usability – How easy it is for a user to navigate a Web site and find the information they are seeking.


Web Browser – The program you use to access the internet. Common browsers include Internet Explorer (IE), Safari, Chrome and Firefox.

Webinar – “Web Seminar”.  Virtual seminars allow people from anywhere in the world to attend via an internet connection.
Web Metrics – See Analytics.


White Hat SEO – Used to describe certain Search Engine Optimization (SEO) methods, being “white hat” means using only SEO techniques that are completely above board and accepted by the Search Engines.

Domain Name – A Web site’s main address. Direct Online Marketing™’s domain is directom.com. - See more at: http://www.directom.com/dom/semresources/internetmarketingtermglossary/#sthash.6jdcKBAH.dpuf

ccTLD – ccTLD’s are “Country-code” TLD‘s showing what country a site is focused on or based in. Using Google and the United Kingdom as an example, Google UK is google.co.uk. Sometimes these ccTLD’s are two sets of letters separated by a period (e.g. “co.uk” for the UK or “com.au” for Australia) and sometimes they are just one set of letters (e.g. “.fr” for France).

Use of separate Web sites on unique ccTLD’s is typically viewed as the best way for exporters to target other countries via search engine optimization. However, site owners can also target outside countries through other means such as through country-focused subdomains or even subdirectories.

Click through Rate (CTR) – # of clicks / # of impressions. Click through rate is a common internet marketing measurement tool for ad effectiveness. This rate tells you how many times people are actually clicking on your ad out of the number of times your ad is shown. Low click through rates can be caused by a number of factors, including copy, placement, and relevance.

Cloaking– Showing a search engine spider or bot one version of a Web page and a different version to the end user. Several search engines have explicit rules against unapproved cloaking. Those violating these guidelines may find their pages penalized or banned from a search engine’s index. As for approved cloaking, this generally only happens with search engines that offer a paid inclusion program. Anyone offering cloaking services should be able to demonstrate explicit approval from a search engine for what it is they intend to do.

Content Management System – Content Management Systems (CMS) allow Web site owners to make text and picture changes to their Web sites without specialized programming knowledge of software like Adobe Dreamweaver or Microsoft FrontPage. Content Management Systems can be edited by anyone with basic word knowledge via an internet connection. No need for length or costly web development contracts or need to wait on someone outside your company to make changes. CMS examples include WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla.

Content Network – Each major search engine offers a form of content network within its paid search interface, typically referred to as content networks, although Google just renamed their content network the Google Display Network. Within Google AdWords, advertisers have two options for content network advertising:

  1. Pick sites. With this option, you can choose the actual sites, or in some cases, sections and pages of sites, on which you want to display your ads.
  2. Contextual advertising. Contextual advertising allows you to use keywords like you would in traditional paid search advertising and the search engines will display your ads next to articles, blog posts, and other Web pages that are related to those keywords.

Both options are great for inexpensive brand awareness on massive scales in addition to more direct means such as lead generation. The days of buying remnant display ads not being worth it are behind us.

- See more at: http://www.directom.com/dom/semresources/internetmarketingtermglossary/#sthash.6jdcKBAH.dpuf

301 Redirect – A 301 redirect automatically causes one url to redirect to another and tells the Web (and search engines) that this redirect is permanent, as opposed to a temporary (302) redirect. 301 redirects are generally preferable for Search Engine Optimization purposes and are therefore often referred to as search engine friendly redirects.

Above the Fold – The part of the page you can see without scrolling down or over. The exact amount of space will vary by viewer because of screen settings. You often pay a premium for advertisement placements above the fold, which will add to the costs of internet marketing services, but may also add to results.

AdExcellence CompanyadCenter – Microsoft adCenter powers paid search results on Microsoft’s bing, Yahoo! (as of November 2010), and other sites within its network. Microsoft adCenter is now the second largest paid search provider in the United States.

Advertising Network – A group of Web sites where one advertiser controls all or a portion of the ads for all sites. A common example is the Google Search Network, which includes AOL, Amazon,Ask.com (formerly Ask Jeeves), and thousands of other sites. In Google AdWords, they offer two types of ad networks on the internet: search and display (which used to be called their content network).

Google AdWordsAdWords – AdWords is Google’s paid search marketing program, the largest such program in the world and in most countries with notable exceptions such as China (Baidu) and Russia (Yandex). Introduced in 2001, AdWords was the first pay per click provider offering the concept of Quality Score, factoring search relevancy (via click-through rate) in along with bid to determine ad position.

Affiliate Marketing – A type of internet marketing in which you partner with other Web sites, individuals, or companies to send traffic to your site. You will typically pay on a Cost per Acquisition (CPA) or Cost per Click (CPC) basis.

Algorithm – The term search engines use for the formulae they use to determine the rankings of your Natural Listings. Search engines will periodically send a Spider through your Web site to view all its information. Their programs analyze then analyze this and other data to value your site and fix whether or not, and how high or low pages on your site will appears on various searches. These algorithms can be very complicated (Google alone currently uses 106 different variables) and search engines closely guard their algorithms as trade secrets.

ALT Tags – HTML tags used to describe Web site graphics by displaying a block of text when moused-over. Search engines are generally unable to view graphics or distinguish text that might be contained within them, and the implementation of an ALT tag enables search engines to categorize that graphic. There is also talk that business Web sites will all be required to utilize ALT tags for all pictures to comply with certain American Disability Act requirements.

Google AnalyticsAnalytics– Also known as Web Metrics. Analytics refers to collection of data about a Web site and its users. Analytics programs typically give performance data on clicks, time, pages viewed, Web site paths, and a variety of other information. The proper use of Web analytics allows Web site owners to improve their visitor experience, which often leads to higher ROI for profit-based sites.

Anchor Text – The clickable words of a hypertext link; they will appear as the underlined blue part in standard Web design. In the preceding sentence, “hypertext link” is the anchor text. As with anything in SEO, it can be overdone, but generally speaking, using your important keywords in the anchor text is highly desirable.

Astroturfing – The process of creating fake grassroots campaigns. Astroturfing is often used specifically regarding review sites like Google Places, Yelp, Judy’s Book and more. These fake reviews can be positive reviews for your own company or slander against your competitors. Not a good idea.

Backlinks– Links from other Web sites pointing to any particular page on your site. Search engines use backlinks to judge a site’s credibility; if a site links to you, the reasoning goes, it is in effect vouching for your authority on a particular subject. Therefore, Link Building is an incredibly important part of Search Engine Optimization. How many links, the quality of the sites linking to you, and how they link to you all are important factors. Also called Inbound Links.

Baidu– Serving primarily China, Baidu is the largest non-US based search engine in the world (although it was started in the United States). Sites can be optimized for Baidu and they offer their own paid search service.

Banned – When pages are removed from a search engine’s index specifically because the search engine has deemed them to be violating their guidelines. Although procedures are starting to loosen up somewhat, typically a search engine will not confirm to you that your site has been banned or why it has been banned. If you knowingly did something against the rules (written or unwritten) that got your site banned, you can probably clean up your act and get back in the game. We hear stories, though, from time to time of companies hiring Search Engine Optimization companies that deliver great, fast results, leave town, and then their Web site mysteriously disappears from the rankings. Google won’t tell them why their site got banned, so the company ends up left out in the cold unless another company can come in and backwards engineer the issues, unravel the work, and get the search engine to reinclude the site.

Banners – Picture advertisements placed on Web sites. Such advertising is often a staple of internet marketing branding campaigns. Depending upon their size and shape, banner ads may also be referred to as buttons, inlines, leaderboards, skyscrapers, or other terms. When using specifics, banner ads refer to a 468×60 pixel size. Banner ads can be static pictures, animated, or interactive. Banner ads appear anywhere on a site – top, middle, bottom, or side. Banner costs vary by Web site and advertiser; two of the most popular pay structures are Cost per 1,000 Impressions (CPM) and flat costs for a specified period of time.

Behavioral Targeting (BT) – An area of internet marketing becoming increasingly refined, behavioral targeting looks to put ads in front of people who should be more receptive to the particular message given past Web behavior, including purchases and Web sites visited. The use of cookies enables online behavioral targeting.

Bingbing – Bing is Microsoft’s search engine, which replaced live.com in June 2009. Bing results now power Yahoo!’s search for paid (except display; through Microsoft adCenter) and organic (except local listings) through an alliance entered into between the two Web giants in December 2009. The deal cleared regulatory concerns in early 2010 and was fully completed in November of the same year.

Black Hat SEO – The opposite of White Hat SEO, these Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, tactics are (attempted) ways of tricking the Search Engines to get better rankings for a Web site. If not immediately, using black hat methods will eventually get your site drastically lower rankings or banned from the search engines altogether. While there are completely legal and ethical techniques you can use to improve rankings, if you design and market a Web site mostly for humans and not for the search engines’ Spiders, you should be okay.

Blog – Short for Web log, blogs are part journal, part Web site. Typically the newest entry (blog post) appears at the top of the page with older entries coming after in reverse chronological order. Several blogging platforms exist; our favorite is WordPress.

Brand Stacking – Multiple page one listings from a single domain. Prior to 2010, a site

- See more at: http://www.directom.com/dom/semresources/internetmarketingtermglossary/#sthash.6jdcKBAH.dpuf

301 Redirect – A 301 redirect automatically causes one url to redirect to another and tells the Web (and search engines) that this redirect is permanent, as opposed to a temporary (302) redirect. 301 redirects are generally preferable for Search Engine Optimization purposes and are therefore often referred to as search engine friendly redirects.

Above the Fold – The part of the page you can see without scrolling down or over. The exact amount of space will vary by viewer because of screen settings. You often pay a premium for advertisement placements above the fold, which will add to the costs of internet marketing services, but may also add to results.

AdExcellence CompanyadCenter – Microsoft adCenter powers paid search results on Microsoft’s bing, Yahoo! (as of November 2010), and other sites within its network. Microsoft adCenter is now the second largest paid search provider in the United States.

Advertising Network – A group of Web sites where one advertiser controls all or a portion of the ads for all sites. A common example is the Google Search Network, which includes AOL, Amazon,Ask.com (formerly Ask Jeeves), and thousands of other sites. In Google AdWords, they offer two types of ad networks on the internet: search and display (which used to be called their content network).

Google AdWordsAdWords – AdWords is Google’s paid search marketing program, the largest such program in the world and in most countries with notable exceptions such as China (Baidu) and Russia (Yandex). Introduced in 2001, AdWords was the first pay per click provider offering the concept of Quality Score, factoring search relevancy (via click-through rate) in along with bid to determine ad position.

Affiliate Marketing – A type of internet marketing in which you partner with other Web sites, individuals, or companies to send traffic to your site. You will typically pay on a Cost per Acquisition (CPA) or Cost per Click (CPC) basis.

Algorithm – The term search engines use for the formulae they use to determine the rankings of your Natural Listings. Search engines will periodically send a Spider through your Web site to view all its information. Their programs analyze then analyze this and other data to value your site and fix whether or not, and how high or low pages on your site will appears on various searches. These algorithms can be very complicated (Google alone currently uses 106 different variables) and search engines closely guard their algorithms as trade secrets.

ALT Tags – HTML tags used to describe Web site graphics by displaying a block of text when moused-over. Search engines are generally unable to view graphics or distinguish text that might be contained within them, and the implementation of an ALT tag enables search engines to categorize that graphic. There is also talk that business Web sites will all be required to utilize ALT tags for all pictures to comply with certain American Disability Act requirements.

Google AnalyticsAnalytics– Also known as Web Metrics. Analytics refers to collection of data about a Web site and its users. Analytics programs typically give performance data on clicks, time, pages viewed, Web site paths, and a variety of other information. The proper use of Web analytics allows Web site owners to improve their visitor experience, which often leads to higher ROI for profit-based sites.

Anchor Text – The clickable words of a hypertext link; they will appear as the underlined blue part in standard Web design. In the preceding sentence, “hypertext link” is the anchor text. As with anything in SEO, it can be overdone, but generally speaking, using your important keywords in the anchor text is highly desirable.

Astroturfing – The process of creating fake grassroots campaigns. Astroturfing is often used specifically regarding review sites like Google Places, Yelp, Judy’s Book and more. These fake reviews can be positive reviews for your own company or slander against your competitors. Not a good idea.

Backlinks– Links from other Web sites pointing to any particular page on your site. Search engines use backlinks to judge a site’s credibility; if a site links to you, the reasoning goes, it is in effect vouching for your authority on a particular subject. Therefore, Link Building is an incredibly important part of Search Engine Optimization. How many links, the quality of the sites linking to you, and how they link to you all are important factors. Also called Inbound Links.

Baidu– Serving primarily China, Baidu is the largest non-US based search engine in the world (although it was started in the United States). Sites can be optimized for Baidu and they offer their own paid search service.

Banned – When pages are removed from a search engine’s index specifically because the search engine has deemed them to be violating their guidelines. Although procedures are starting to loosen up somewhat, typically a search engine will not confirm to you that your site has been banned or why it has been banned. If you knowingly did something against the rules (written or unwritten) that got your site banned, you can probably clean up your act and get back in the game. We hear stories, though, from time to time of companies hiring Search Engine Optimization companies that deliver great, fast results, leave town, and then their Web site mysteriously disappears from the rankings. Google won’t tell them why their site got banned, so the company ends up left out in the cold unless another company can come in and backwards engineer the issues, unravel the work, and get the search engine to reinclude the site.

Banners – Picture advertisements placed on Web sites. Such advertising is often a staple of internet marketing branding campaigns. Depending upon their size and shape, banner ads may also be referred to as buttons, inlines, leaderboards, skyscrapers, or other terms. When using specifics, banner ads refer to a 468×60 pixel size. Banner ads can be static pictures, animated, or interactive. Banner ads appear anywhere on a site – top, middle, bottom, or side. Banner costs vary by Web site and advertiser; two of the most popular pay structures are Cost per 1,000 Impressions (CPM) and flat costs for a specified period of time.

Behavioral Targeting (BT) – An area of internet marketing becoming increasingly refined, behavioral targeting looks to put ads in front of people who should be more receptive to the particular message given past Web behavior, including purchases and Web sites visited. The use of cookies enables online behavioral targeting.

Bingbing – Bing is Microsoft’s search engine, which replaced live.com in June 2009. Bing results now power Yahoo!’s search for paid (except display; through Microsoft adCenter) and organic (except local listings) through an alliance entered into between the two Web giants in December 2009. The deal cleared regulatory concerns in early 2010 and was fully completed in November of the same year.

Black Hat SEO – The opposite of White Hat SEO, these Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, tactics are (attempted) ways of tricking the Search Engines to get better rankings for a Web site. If not immediately, using black hat methods will eventually get your site drastically lower rankings or banned from the search engines altogether. While there are completely legal and ethical techniques you can use to improve rankings, if you design and market a Web site mostly for humans and not for the search engines’ Spiders, you should be okay.

Blog – Short for Web log, blogs are part journal, part Web site. Typically the newest entry (blog post) appears at the top of the page with older entries coming after in reverse chronological order. Several blogging platforms exist; our favorite is WordPress.

Brand Stacking – Multiple page one listings from a single domain. Prior to 2010, a site

- See more at: http://www.directom.com/dom/semresources/internetmarketingtermglossary/#sthash.6jdcKBAH.dpuf

301 Redirect – A 301 redirect automatically causes one url to redirect to another and tells the Web (and search engines) that this redirect is permanent, as opposed to a temporary (302) redirect. 301 redirects are generally preferable for Search Engine Optimization purposes and are therefore often referred to as search engine friendly redirects.

Above the Fold – The part of the page you can see without scrolling down or over. The exact amount of space will vary by viewer because of screen settings. You often pay a premium for advertisement placements above the fold, which will add to the costs of internet marketing services, but may also add to results.

AdExcellence CompanyadCenter – Microsoft adCenter powers paid search results on Microsoft’s bing, Yahoo! (as of November 2010), and other sites within its network. Microsoft adCenter is now the second largest paid search provider in the United States.

Advertising Network – A group of Web sites where one advertiser controls all or a portion of the ads for all sites. A common example is the Google Search Network, which includes AOL, Amazon,Ask.com (formerly Ask Jeeves), and thousands of other sites. In Google AdWords, they offer two types of ad networks on the internet: search and display (which used to be called their content network).

Google AdWordsAdWords – AdWords is Google’s paid search marketing program, the largest such program in the world and in most countries with notable exceptions such as China (Baidu) and Russia (Yandex). Introduced in 2001, AdWords was the first pay per click provider offering the concept of Quality Score, factoring search relevancy (via click-through rate) in along with bid to determine ad position.

Affiliate Marketing – A type of internet marketing in which you partner with other Web sites, individuals, or companies to send traffic to your site. You will typically pay on a Cost per Acquisition (CPA) or Cost per Click (CPC) basis.

Algorithm – The term search engines use for the formulae they use to determine the rankings of your Natural Listings. Search engines will periodically send a Spider through your Web site to view all its information. Their programs analyze then analyze this and other data to value your site and fix whether or not, and how high or low pages on your site will appears on various searches. These algorithms can be very complicated (Google alone currently uses 106 different variables) and search engines closely guard their algorithms as trade secrets.

ALT Tags – HTML tags used to describe Web site graphics by displaying a block of text when moused-over. Search engines are generally unable to view graphics or distinguish text that might be contained within them, and the implementation of an ALT tag enables search engines to categorize that graphic. There is also talk that business Web sites will all be required to utilize ALT tags for all pictures to comply with certain American Disability Act requirements.

Google AnalyticsAnalytics– Also known as Web Metrics. Analytics refers to collection of data about a Web site and its users. Analytics programs typically give performance data on clicks, time, pages viewed, Web site paths, and a variety of other information. The proper use of Web analytics allows Web site owners to improve their visitor experience, which often leads to higher ROI for profit-based sites.

Anchor Text – The clickable words of a hypertext link; they will appear as the underlined blue part in standard Web design. In the preceding sentence, “hypertext link” is the anchor text. As with anything in SEO, it can be overdone, but generally speaking, using your important keywords in the anchor text is highly desirable.

Astroturfing – The process of creating fake grassroots campaigns. Astroturfing is often used specifically regarding review sites like Google Places, Yelp, Judy’s Book and more. These fake reviews can be positive reviews for your own company or slander against your competitors. Not a good idea.

Backlinks– Links from other Web sites pointing to any particular page on your site. Search engines use backlinks to judge a site’s credibility; if a site links to you, the reasoning goes, it is in effect vouching for your authority on a particular subject. Therefore, Link Building is an incredibly important part of Search Engine Optimization. How many links, the quality of the sites linking to you, and how they link to you all are important factors. Also called Inbound Links.

Baidu– Serving primarily China, Baidu is the largest non-US based search engine in the world (although it was started in the United States). Sites can be optimized for Baidu and they offer their own paid search service.

Banned – When pages are removed from a search engine’s index specifically because the search engine has deemed them to be violating their guidelines. Although procedures are starting to loosen up somewhat, typically a search engine will not confirm to you that your site has been banned or why it has been banned. If you knowingly did something against the rules (written or unwritten) that got your site banned, you can probably clean up your act and get back in the game. We hear stories, though, from time to time of companies hiring Search Engine Optimization companies that deliver great, fast results, leave town, and then their Web site mysteriously disappears from the rankings. Google won’t tell them why their site got banned, so the company ends up left out in the cold unless another company can come in and backwards engineer the issues, unravel the work, and get the search engine to reinclude the site.

Banners – Picture advertisements placed on Web sites. Such advertising is often a staple of internet marketing branding campaigns. Depending upon their size and shape, banner ads may also be referred to as buttons, inlines, leaderboards, skyscrapers, or other terms. When using specifics, banner ads refer to a 468×60 pixel size. Banner ads can be static pictures, animated, or interactive. Banner ads appear anywhere on a site – top, middle, bottom, or side. Banner costs vary by Web site and advertiser; two of the most popular pay structures are Cost per 1,000 Impressions (CPM) and flat costs for a specified period of time.

Behavioral Targeting (BT) – An area of internet marketing becoming increasingly refined, behavioral targeting looks to put ads in front of people who should be more receptive to the particular message given past Web behavior, including purchases and Web sites visited. The use of cookies enables online behavioral targeting.

Bingbing – Bing is Microsoft’s search engine, which replaced live.com in June 2009. Bing results now power Yahoo!’s search for paid (except display; through Microsoft adCenter) and organic (except local listings) through an alliance entered into between the two Web giants in December 2009. The deal cleared regulatory concerns in early 2010 and was fully completed in November of the same year.

Black Hat SEO – The opposite of White Hat SEO, these Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, tactics are (attempted) ways of tricking the Search Engines to get better rankings for a Web site. If not immediately, using black hat methods will eventually get your site drastically lower rankings or banned from the search engines altogether. While there are completely legal and ethical techniques you can use to improve rankings, if you design and market a Web site mostly for humans and not for the search engines’ Spiders, you should be okay.

Blog – Short for Web log, blogs are part journal, part Web site. Typically the newest entry (blog post) appears at the top of the page with older entries coming after in reverse chronological order. Several blogging platforms exist; our favorite is WordPress.

Brand Stacking – Multiple page one listings from a single domain. Prior to 2010, a site

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301 Redirect – A 301 redirect automatically causes one url to redirect to another and tells the Web (and search engines) that this redirect is permanent, as opposed to a temporary (302) redirect. 301 redirects are generally preferable for Search Engine Optimization purposes and are therefore often referred to as search engine friendly redirects.

Above the Fold – The part of the page you can see without scrolling down or over. The exact amount of space will vary by viewer because of screen settings. You often pay a premium for advertisement placements above the fold, which will add to the costs of internet marketing services, but may also add to results.

AdExcellence CompanyadCenter – Microsoft adCenter powers paid search results on Microsoft’s bing, Yahoo! (as of November 2010), and other sites within its network. Microsoft adCenter is now the second largest paid search provider in the United States.

Advertising Network – A group of Web sites where one advertiser controls all or a portion of the ads for all sites. A common example is the Google Search Network, which includes AOL, Amazon,Ask.com (formerly Ask Jeeves), and thousands of other sites. In Google AdWords, they offer two types of ad networks on the internet: search and display (which used to be called their content network).

Google AdWordsAdWords – AdWords is Google’s paid search marketing program, the largest such program in the world and in most countries with notable exceptions such as China (Baidu) and Russia (Yandex). Introduced in 2001, AdWords was the first pay per click provider offering the concept of Quality Score, factoring search relevancy (via click-through rate) in along with bid to determine ad position.

Affiliate Marketing – A type of internet marketing in which you partner with other Web sites, individuals, or companies to send traffic to your site. You will typically pay on a Cost per Acquisition (CPA) or Cost per Click (CPC) basis.

Algorithm – The term search engines use for the formulae they use to determine the rankings of your Natural Listings. Search engines will periodically send a Spider through your Web site to view all its information. Their programs analyze then analyze this and other data to value your site and fix whether or not, and how high or low pages on your site will appears on various searches. These algorithms can be very complicated (Google alone currently uses 106 different variables) and search engines closely guard their algorithms as trade secrets.

ALT Tags – HTML tags used to describe Web site graphics by displaying a block of text when moused-over. Search engines are generally unable to view graphics or distinguish text that might be contained within them, and the implementation of an ALT tag enables search engines to categorize that graphic. There is also talk that business Web sites will all be required to utilize ALT tags for all pictures to comply with certain American Disability Act requirements.

Google AnalyticsAnalytics– Also known as Web Metrics. Analytics refers to collection of data about a Web site and its users. Analytics programs typically give performance data on clicks, time, pages viewed, Web site paths, and a variety of other information. The proper use of Web analytics allows Web site owners to improve their visitor experience, which often leads to higher ROI for profit-based sites.

Anchor Text – The clickable words of a hypertext link; they will appear as the underlined blue part in standard Web design. In the preceding sentence, “hypertext link” is the anchor text. As with anything in SEO, it can be overdone, but generally speaking, using your important keywords in the anchor text is highly desirable.

Astroturfing – The process of creating fake grassroots campaigns. Astroturfing is often used specifically regarding review sites like Google Places, Yelp, Judy’s Book and more. These fake reviews can be positive reviews for your own company or slander against your competitors. Not a good idea.

Backlinks– Links from other Web sites pointing to any particular page on your site. Search engines use backlinks to judge a site’s credibility; if a site links to you, the reasoning goes, it is in effect vouching for your authority on a particular subject. Therefore, Link Building is an incredibly important part of Search Engine Optimization. How many links, the quality of the sites linking to you, and how they link to you all are important factors. Also called Inbound Links.

Baidu– Serving primarily China, Baidu is the largest non-US based search engine in the world (although it was started in the United States). Sites can be optimized for Baidu and they offer their own paid search service.

Banned – When pages are removed from a search engine’s index specifically because the search engine has deemed them to be violating their guidelines. Although procedures are starting to loosen up somewhat, typically a search engine will not confirm to you that your site has been banned or why it has been banned. If you knowingly did something against the rules (written or unwritten) that got your site banned, you can probably clean up your act and get back in the game. We hear stories, though, from time to time of companies hiring Search Engine Optimization companies that deliver great, fast results, leave town, and then their Web site mysteriously disappears from the rankings. Google won’t tell them why their site got banned, so the company ends up left out in the cold unless another company can come in and backwards engineer the issues, unravel the work, and get the search engine to reinclude the site.

Banners – Picture advertisements placed on Web sites. Such advertising is often a staple of internet marketing branding campaigns. Depending upon their size and shape, banner ads may also be referred to as buttons, inlines, leaderboards, skyscrapers, or other terms. When using specifics, banner ads refer to a 468×60 pixel size. Banner ads can be static pictures, animated, or interactive. Banner ads appear anywhere on a site – top, middle, bottom, or side. Banner costs vary by Web site and advertiser; two of the most popular pay structures are Cost per 1,000 Impressions (CPM) and flat costs for a specified period of time.

Behavioral Targeting (BT) – An area of internet marketing becoming increasingly refined, behavioral targeting looks to put ads in front of people who should be more receptive to the particular message given past Web behavior, including purchases and Web sites visited. The use of cookies enables online behavioral targeting.

Bingbing – Bing is Microsoft’s search engine, which replaced live.com in June 2009. Bing results now power Yahoo!’s search for paid (except display; through Microsoft adCenter) and organic (except local listings) through an alliance entered into between the two Web giants in December 2009. The deal cleared regulatory concerns in early 2010 and was fully completed in November of the same year.

Black Hat SEO – The opposite of White Hat SEO, these Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, tactics are (attempted) ways of tricking the Search Engines to get better rankings for a Web site. If not immediately, using black hat methods will eventually get your site drastically lower rankings or banned from the search engines altogether. While there are completely legal and ethical techniques you can use to improve rankings, if you design and market a Web site mostly for humans and not for the search engines’ Spiders, you should be okay.

Blog – Short for Web log, blogs are part journal, part Web site. Typically the newest entry (blog post) appears at the top of the page with older entries coming after in reverse chronological order. Several blogging platforms exist; our favorite is WordPress.

Brand Stacking – Multiple page one listings from a single domain. Prior to 2010, a site

- See more at: http://www.directom.com/dom/semresources/internetmarketingtermglossary/#sthash.6jdcKBAH.dpuf